Nancy's Paris Blog

 

Hi, I'm Nancy Burke and welcome to my blog. I've lived in France on the outskirts of Paris for over 20 years with my husband, Rob, and a little more recently, our black cat Cassie. My friends tell me that I know more about Paris than most Parisians. I don't know about that but I do try to make the most of living in one of the world's greatest centers of culture, art and architecture. Most weekdays I'm out and about visiting museums, taking tours, or just experiencing French life. I was a long time director of the Friday Tour Group and I'm still an active member.

Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
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Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2018 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke
Photo: © 2019 Nancy Burke

10 June 2019

 

 

 

 “Le Monde en sphères”

 

This chronological and most informative exhibition at Bibliothèque nationale de France - site François Mitterrand (Galerie 2) retraces 2,500 years about the spherical model of the universe and scientific instruments from Antiquity to the present day. The history begins with the conception of a closed spherical world centered on the Earth and continues to that of an infinite universe in perpetual evolution. Nearly 200 exceptional objects including over forty terrestrial and celestial globes and spheres, rare archeological remains, rich handwritten and printed treatises and magnificent world maps, prints, paintings and other artworks represent the Earth and the sky.

There is much to see and learn in the various areas. Interactive terminals provide information for all ages. Have you ever wondered how a flat representation of the earth can be converted into a circular representation? To see this done watch “La Fabrication d’une Globe” with six short explanatory sections. I have now added the word “gore” to my English vocabulary. Notice how often a globe in represented in paintings over the centuries. Look carefully to find a globe of the earth embossed for the visually impaired. Interpret what you think Thomas Hirschhorn’s Outgrowth unique wall of 131 round contaminated globes placed in seven rows means to our contemporary society. Take a moment to watch an entertaining extract from Charlie Chaplin’s “Le Dictateur” (1940) with the balloon globe. I hope you enjoy this show as much as I did!

If you have never seen Les Globes de Coronelli, two monumental spheres each four meters in diameter dedicated to Louis 14th, walk nearby to the West Hall and see them plus learn more about the history of globes in this permanent exhibition. It’s a perfect complement to the temporary show.

 

Hints:

1. This exhibition runs through 21 July 2019. Galerie 2 is open Tuesday through Saturday from10:00AM to 7:00PM and Sunday from 1:00PM to 7:00PM. Tarif reduit with Amis du Louvre card.

2.A brochure is provided in French. Information on the walls throughout the exhibition is in French and English. The interactive terminals are in French, English and Arabic.

 

Check here for more information: